Wednesday, February 24, 2010

Isn't the problem with Australia taking Japan to the ICJ over whaling...

...the potential for this to open up for scrutiny our generally unrecognised claim on Antarctica, as well as the way we assert our maritime boundaries?

We didn't want that explored when East Timor was the potential plaintiff, in fact we didn't think much of the ICJ full-stop back then.

This is a thought that's occurred to me, rather than a well-researched hypothesis. But it does seem likely that the government will not take its rhetoric any further due to the risk that international litigation might prove to be a double-edged sword that swings back and maims us.

That and the possibility that it will hold that the whaling is sufficiently scientific, thereby robbing opponents of their legal objection...

UPDATE: well, well, it appears I might have been wrong. In my defence I didn't count on race and nationalism being such a hot spot in this Australian election. Again.

4 comments:

Ann ODyne said...

Denmark and Norway have whaling industries we don't seem to object to, so I guess this is about Territory and not about the magnificence of whales.

While I am here, may I commend to you the blog post Batt Man & Robbin'

Penthe said...

Same thought had occurred to me. Especially about the boundaries we say we have.

But I think the whale thing is really about the whales. People are quite emotional about the whales. Are they voting-emotional? Hard to say.

BwcaBrownie said...

My admiration of whales will affect my vote. Age 61 and always voted and worked for Labor candidates but that can change. Bloody Garrett supporting Gunns in Tasmania turned my tide let me tell you.
He's so Sydney.

Armagnac Daddy said...

Had a read of that Anno, twas a good post, an interesting counterbalance to Helen's pretty spirited defence of Garrett- or to be more precise attack on his attackers.

It's a mess. I always thought it was a mistake to put him in Enviro, because it is so compromised under Labor, especially with the unions and the Tassie marginals.